4 Easy Steps to Get Your Bedroom Closet Organized

Follow these 4 simple steps and your bedroom closet will be organized in no time.

One of the biggest obstacles to a more organized and orderly life is clutter.

My definition of clutter is the unnecessary stuff that we accumulate and form an even-more-unnecessary attachment to, making it that much harder to let go.

Sometimes we bring necessary things into our lives/homes/cars/purses that without proper management end up being very hard to distinguish from clutter. Bills, school papers, clothes, home decor items, toys, etc. all fall into this category.

If we let clutter pile up and take over, it will. This leads me to today’s subject: the master bedroom closet.

Our master bedroom has two full-sized closets that are definitely underutilized. Because of the large sliding doors, it’s difficult to access the full interior. The shelving units help, but get messy easily with piles of clothes precariously balanced.

One rule of thumb when it comes to organization: it always gets worse before it gets better.

STEP ONE: EMPTY THE CLOSET

Take everything out. I mean everything. You can do this in stages if you’re limited on time. Pull out hanging clothes, clear off shelves, empty drawers. Leave no stone unturned.

STEP TWO: ASSESS EACH ITEM

Go through every piece of clothing you own. Get rid of anything that doesn’t fit, has lost its shape,  has stains or discoloration, is damaged, or if you just don’t like it anymore.

There are going to be clothes that you’ve kept because of the memories attached. I have these things too and it’s up to you whether they make the cut. I saved a few things simply because the nostalgia was too strong for me to let them go. Notice I said “a few things” not “every t-shirt I wore in 1998.” Use discretion, but don’t discount sentimental value.

There might be items that don’t currently fit, but have lasting value. I’m mostly talking about expensive items. If you truly think there’s a chance you’ll wear it again, save it for another six months. At the end of six months, reassess and toss anything you still haven’t worn.

I saved one pair of jeans that I loved before baby #2 that I really hope will fit again soon. The style is still on trend so I saved them from the donation pile for now.

STEP THREE: DIVIDE THE “NO” PILE INTO ITEMS TO DONATE OR THROW AWAY

Donate items that are still in good condition to charitable groups. Throw away things that no one else can use. Broken flip flops, socks with holes, etc. aren’t good donation items.

I purged like never before, and it felt REALLY good. The clothes going back into the closet are in good condition and fit me now.

For items that you aren’t sure about, try this trick. Turn all your hangers around so they face the wrong direction. Each time you wear an item, turn the hanger to the normal direction. After three months, reassess your closet and remove the clothing that hasn’t been worn.

STEP FOUR: CLEAN THE ACTUAL CLOSET & ORGANIZE YOUR BELONGINGS

While the closet is empty, clean the shelves and vacuum all the nooks and crannies.

Get rid of broken hangers and storage bins. You might consider replacing wire hangers with plastic or wooden ones.

Purchase bins or dividers for your shelves to keep clothes in neat piles. Use drawer dividers to corral smaller items like socks and underwear. Check out my Organization board on Pinterest for more inspiration.

Follow these 4 simple steps and your bedroom closet will be organized in no time.

When your bedroom closet organization is finished, getting ready will be an easier process. Knowing that all your clothes fit properly and look good allows your brain to concentrate on more important things. As moms, we have plenty of other things we need to focus on!

What tips do you have for organizing your bedroom closet?

Check out the entire 14 Days of Organization series for plenty of tips & strategies to get your home in order!

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14 Days of Organization

We're talking about all things organization for 14 days.

Today I’m kicking off a 14-day series all about organization! For a busy mama, organizational skills can be literally life-changing. I’m not exaggerating.

When my life is organized, my stress level is dramatically lower. I feel more relaxed when I know that I’m prepared and that nothing is slipping through the cracks.

So, for the next couple weeks, I’ll be sharing the tips and strategies I use to keep my home, family, and personal life in order.

My goal is not perfection. Honestly, organization doesn’t come easily to me. It takes effort to keep my life in order, and sometimes I fail miserably.

But I do want to be thoughtful and purposeful about how I manage our home so that our family can live in a more peaceful environment. With organization comes order, and with order comes peace.

Before we launch into the first area of organization tomorrow, I want to point out a few possible challenges.

1 | You don’t have a system

Unless you’re already fairly organized, conquering problem areas without a strategy can be daunting. Without a plan of action, it’s hard to know where to start.

If clutter is your main issue, for example, you can’t expect to clear out all the clutter in the entire house in one day. For one thing, you most likely have other responsibilities that can’t fall by the wayside.

Instead of trying to tackle a monstrous project all at once, break it into manageable pieces so that you can make progress while also handling other tasks, like feeding your kids 😉

2 | You have too much stuff

I’ll admit that I’m guilty of this one. We simply accumulate too much stuff. Instead of ever feeling truly organized, I end up moving things around to make room for the stuff that feels most important at the time.

My husband calls this process “s#@t shuffling” and it’s pretty accurate. I have a hard time getting rid of things that I think I might use one day so I try to make room for new stuff by shuffling the existing things around.

The best way to solve this problem is to start limiting the amount of stuff you own. For example, when new toys come in, get rid of the old toys that the kids no longer use. New clothes replace old items in the closet. An updated kitchen tool takes the place of the old version.

I’m prone to buying home decor items without having an immediate need for them just because they’re pretty. I would serve our home organization better by only buying what I will actually use.

If there’s not an immediate use (a seasonal item is a good example) then I need to get rid of something I no longer want to make room for the new item.

3 | You spend more time planning than doing

In our Pinterest-driven world, it’s so easy to scroll through hours of inspiration for any project on your to-do list. And let’s be honest, sometimes that’s much easier than actually doing what you need to do.

It can be a lot more fun looking at other peoples’ beautifully organized pantries than doing the hard work of organizing our own, am I right?!

The problem is that we spend so much time acquiring information, we can get stuck. This is called “analysis paralysis,” which basically means you’re so focused on forming the perfect strategy that you never move into the execution phase of the project. #guilty

Reading about how to use your day planner effectively is not helpful if you never start using your day planner. You have to move from strategizing to implementing if you want to accomplish your goals.

I’m really excited for this next couple of weeks to reinvigorate my own systems of organization and to encourage you to do the same!


Check out all the 14 days of Organization posts!

4 Easy Steps to Get Your Bedroom Closet Organized

3 Steps for Simple Linen Cabinet Organization

3 Tips for Organizing Kid’s Rooms

How to Keep Your Car Organized

Purse Essentials: What You Need & How to Stay Organized

Use Your Phone to Stay Organized

5 Easy Ways to Protect Your Home When You Travel

How to Pack for a Family Vacation

How to Plan an Effective Schedule

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3 Elements for a Killer Morning Routine

How to create your ideal morning routine.

It took me a long time to get to a place where I enjoy the morning. I was a perpetual night owl, even after my kids were born. I woke up every morning wishing that I could stay in bed just a little longer.

Eventually I realized that staying up late and waking to the sounds of my kids getting up wasn’t working. I hate to say it, but I was often grumpy and snappy in the morning until I’d had a chance to fully wake up.

It’s hard to open your eyes to immediate demands, even if they come from someone unable to meet their own needs. I didn’t like that I sometimes felt resentful that my children had woken me up. In yet another example of God’s perfect timing, that’s when I discovered Hello Mornings.

I found a community of moms who felt just like I did. They didn’t want to be grouches, dragging themselves out of bed in the morning. Just like me, they wanted to greet their babies with smiles and hugs. So I retired my night owl tendencies (mostly) and worked to create my ideal morning routine.

Do you want to make your own mornings more effective and pleasant?? Here’s what I do:

1 | I wake up early.

If there’s one element that has been a game changer for my morning outlook, it’s getting up before my kids. Sometimes I’m only up 15 or 20 minutes before my oldest, who typically wakes around 6:30, but it really makes a huge difference.

The key to getting up ahead of my family is getting to bed at a reasonable time. I am a sleeper. Just ask my husband. Most nights I get about 8 to 8 ½ hours of sleep. If I get less than that, I either need a nap or a second cup of coffee.

Once you figure out the time you plan to wake up, count backwards the number of hours of sleep you need. That’s your bedtime goal. For me, I set my alarm for 6:00 so I’m usually lights out by 10:00pm. That might seem really early to some people, but it works for me so that I feel rested and ready to get up in the morning.

Start slow. Try getting up 15 minutes earlier than normal. After a few days, try 20 minutes. Keep working incrementally until you’re at your ideal wake time.

2 | I’m intentional with my time.

The idea behind getting up before your kids is that you start the day with intention. Waking up ahead of schedule means that you have time to do something for YOU before you have to do anything for your family.

The first thing I do when I come downstairs is make my coffee. I actually wake up looking forward to it. Am I the only one who does this?!

After I’ve got my coffee, I sit down with my Bible, journal, and my Bible study. I spend anywhere from 20-45 minutes soaking up some good study time. If I don’t do my quiet time in the morning, it just doesn’t happen, no matter how good my intentions might be.

I can feel a difference in my day when I spend even a short time reading my Bible and devoting time to studying God’s word. I’m calmer, more at peace, and more aligned with God’s direction when I start my day with even a short time in the Word.

If that’s not your thing, there are plenty of other ways to get your day off to a good start. Journaling, reading, yoga, and meditation are all ideas for purposeful self care first thing in the morning.

3 | I assess the rest of my day.

On Sunday, I map out the week so I can see all my appointments, kids activities, and important dates ahead of time. Each morning I review what’s on the schedule for the day.

It helps me remember any time commitments, and I also write down tasks that need to be done. Before I launch into the day, I have a good idea of what it’s going to look like.

In the past, I wrote things on a monthly calendar, which I still do. But if for some reason I didn’t look at the calendar in the morning, a commitment or appointment might slip through the cracks. Now I’m just taking some time to refresh my memory so this doesn’t happen.

Having a routine to start off my morning improved my attitude, not only as a mom, but personally as well. I no longer dread the sound of my alarm. Actually I’m often already starting to wake up before the alarm goes off. If you struggle in the mornings (and you have kids who sleep through the night most of the time,) developing a morning routine can be a huge improvement.

One final reason I truly believe in the power of my morning routine… if I’ve been off the regular pattern for a few days, I look forward to getting back to it. Even if I’ve been on vacation, I’m still excited to put my habits back in place. To me, that says it all.

What does your morning routine look like??

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How to Create White Space in Your Life

Be purposeful with your weekly commitments and responsibilities so that you can create white space in your schedule. This allows time for rest and self care.

I’ve been on a productivity and time management reading binge lately. Part of my interest stems from the goal-setting process I went through before the year began. Using Power Sheets for the first time opened my eyes to a lot of my own behavior patterns.

Looking back at what worked last year and what didn’t work, I was able to see that time management is an area where I really want to grow and improve. I have an abundance of time, but I can be a very poor steward of those hours.

While you may not feel like you have plenty of time to accomplish all you need, you probably recognize that there is some time in your life that gets squandered. I don’t believe that every minute of the day should be productive. However, I also know that I waste far more time than I’d like to admit.

What is White Space?

If we use our time wisely, it creates the opportunity for what I call “white space” in our weekly schedule. Some call it “margin” or “breathing room” or simply “free time.” The idea is the same. We need to have time available for rest and self care so that we don’t burn out.

Be purposeful with your weekly commitments and responsibilities so that you can create white space in your schedule. This allows time for rest and self care.

In the same way that the white space in this image allows you to focus more clearly on the different elements, white space in your schedule gives you the opportunity to find rest so that you can more easily concentrate on your priorities.

Related: Self Care – What, Why and How?

Far too often, I see moms who don’t feel as though they can prioritize their own needs. It seems selfish or like it just won’t fit into their schedule. They’re so used to worrying about everyone else that they don’t leave any room for themselves.

Here’s a little tough love: we often use the excuse that we don’t have time for certain activities when the truth is that we don’t make time for those things. Being a mom is a round-the-clock job. If we let it, the demands on our time and energy will be all-consuming. It’s up to us to find time to recharge our batteries.

How to create white space

You might be thinking, “how on earth am I supposed to make time for myself when I can barely keep up with the needs of my family?” Trust me when I say that I get this. It can be incredibly hard to carve time out of a busy schedule for something that doesn’t seem like a necessity.

But in this case, attitude is half the battle. If you don’t believe that you deserve time to rest, recharge, or invest in your own interests, then you will struggle to find the time. On the other hand, if you recognize that you can’t do all the things without some time of your own, then you will make white space a priority.

Here are the 5 steps I take to make sure that I carve out white space in my schedule so I don’t end up feeling exhausted and overburdened.

1 | Determine static commitments in your schedule.

Some elements of your weekly calendar are consistent the majority of the time. Aside from vacations and snow days, the kids are at school for the same duration each week. Music lessons, sports practices, and clubs generally meet at the same times. If you work outside the home, you most likely have some regularity to the hours you spend at your job.

Enter these static time commitments into your calendar first since they are the most predictable. Since there’s less (or no) flexibility in these activities, you’ll need to work around them.

2 | Schedule time for other responsibilities.

Aside from static commitments, we all have responsibilities that require our time each week. Household duties like cleaning, grocery shopping, and meal prep all demand our attention.

Make a list of all of the extra responsibilities you need to address in a normal week. Then divide these tasks into 3 categories: cleaning, errands, and personal.

Cleaning and errands are self-explanatory. Personal tasks might include things like exercise or daily Bible study or journaling.

Now put these tasks into your weekly schedule. For example, Sunday might be when you plan your weekly menu and grocery shop. Monday could be the day you vacuum. A less structured option is to schedule a block of time each day for household tasks.

The idea is to have these responsibilities worked into your schedule so that you know when you actually have time available for white space activities.

3 | Block out time for white space.

It might seem counterintuitive to schedule “free” time. But, the reality is that if we aren’t purposeful about planning time to rest, we often don’t do it at all.

White space doesn’t need to be hours and hours or every day. Planning 30 minutes to eat lunch and read a book in peace is a perfectly good way to recharge for me. Mindlessly scrolling on social media is not. It’s not that I don’t like to do it. It just isn’t what refuels my tank.

When you know that the rest of your commitments and responsibilities are accounted for in your schedule, you’re less likely to feel guilty about doing something for yourself. Having coffee with a friend is much more pleasant when you aren’t feeling like you should be doing x, y or z.

4 | How to Find time in a busy schedule.

If you put down your static commitments and your extra responsibilities, and you don’t see any additional time, there are a couple things to think about.

Are there activities that you’re committing to that bring you zero fulfillment? Saying no to an opportunity might be hard in the moment, but beneficial in the long run. I know this is easier said than done, but it’s also too easy to spread ourselves thin.

While you can’t say no to raising your children, you don’t have to be on every fundraising committee at school. Just because someone asks does not mean you have to say yes if it means giving up your only free morning.

Another trick I use is to make otherwise wasted time more beneficial or enjoyable. Instead of just watching my kids’ 40 minute karate class, I pop in headphones and listen to a podcast. It makes the time pass in a more interesting way where exactly zero participation is required from me as a parent. I do the same when I’m in the car running errands.

When my kids were home full time, we had a babysitter come every other Friday. She arrived in the afternoon so I could have a couple hours on my own. Then my husband would come home from work and we’d go out for a date night. Yes, it cost money, but it was worth it. Swapping time with another mom is a great option if you’re on a tight budget or don’t have family nearby to help.

5 | Focus during your white space.

My final tip is to make sure that when you go through the steps to block out white space in your schedule, use it wisely. Don’t channel surf or scroll through social media unless that is truly what recharges your batteries.

Don’t do “just one more thing” around the house that eats into the time you’ve allocated. While you’re in charge of your own schedule, we all know how quickly those little things add up. Give yourself permission to use that time for you.

This is a sample of my weekly schedule:

Be purposeful with your weekly commitments and responsibilities so that you can create white space in your schedule. This allows time for rest and self care.

Pink is for free time, personal responsibilities, or time with my husband. Yellow is time primarily devoted to kid-related stuff, although dinner technically falls under family time. Purple is for work/blog-related tasks and household duties. Green is family time. Blue is sleep.

I purposely kept the descriptions vague so that it would be easier to envision your own life broken into these categories. Obviously they sometimes overlap. Saturday and Sunday include household tasks, date nights, and kids’ activities on a regular basis. However, those days are typically spent together as a family in some capacity.

Also, remember that this is a work in progress for me too. I don’t stick to a rigid schedule every day. Mapping out my week is my attempt to stay focused and purposeful about how I spend my time.

If you’ve been struggling to get things done, this might help you as well. Think of it as a game plan for the week. It’s not going to go perfectly, but it provides a starting point.

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Revive Your Goals in 4 Steps

Four easy steps to revive your goals when motivation has stalled.

It’s only a month into the new year, and studies show that 90% of resolutions and goals have already been cast aside. The excitement of a clean slate has worn off and motivation has stalled. Maybe you already feel defeated, but you can still revive your goals for this year!

Even if you’ve completely fallen off the wagon, there’s no reason why you can’t achieve the plans you set out for the year. As Lara Casey of Cultivate What Matters says, “There is nothing magical about January.” You don’t have to start on January 1st to reach your goals.

I’ll be the first to say that accomplishing goals is hard, especially if you’ve got big goals. It takes commitment, perseverance, and focus to keep moving forward.

I don’t know about you, but sometimes the biggest challenge for me is sticking to it when I’m seeing really slow progress. Our attention span as a society is getting shorter all the time. We’re used to getting answers at the click of a button. So when progress is minimal, we get anxious to see those bigger results.

How do you reignite that motivation you felt when you were mapping out all those awesome goals? How do you recognize even the smallest steps forward as movement in the right direction?

Here are 4 steps to get you fired up to revive your goals:

1 | Reflect on the past month.

If you’re feeling a little let down by how quickly you let go of your ambitions, it’s a good idea to first examine where you lost sight of the path.

What worked well as you jump-started your goals this past month? Maybe you had strategies in place to get you started off on the right foot. Maybe you did prep work ahead of time. Take a look at the ways you initially set yourself up for success.

Then look at what didn’t work. Did you start giving in to small temptations that snowballed into giving up altogether? Maybe you stopped doing those daily action steps that makes a giant goal feel manageable.

By pinpointing where you lost your motivation, you can more clearly see what steps you need to take to get back on track. But by looking at what worked well, you’ll remember the progress you did make.

2 | Revisit your priorities.

If you didn’t do so before you laid out your goals, make a list of your priorities. What truly matters to you right now? Where do you want your focus to be aimed?

Don’t worry about what you think your priorities should be. If you try to direct your focus on an area just because you think you should, your heart won’t be in it. It’s a better use of your time and energy to be honest about what you really want.

Once you have your priority list, look at your goals and make sure they align with your priorities. If one of your priorities is financial stability, then a goal to travel more might not make sense. However, a goal to save money for a specific trip or future travel is still in line with that priority.

I recently heard that your intention matters much more than your level of discipline when it comes to reaching goals. If you have an important reason/priority behind your goal, you’re much more likely to be committed and willing to make changes in order to succeed.

3 | Refine your action steps.

Be specific about the action plan for accomplishing your goals. If you were too vague when you initially mapped out a plan for reaching a specific goal, refine the steps you need to take in order to succeed.

“Lose weight” is not measurable so it gives you less direction. “Lose 10lbs by June 1st” not only gives you a set definition of success, but also makes it easier to set benchmarks along the way. Your action plan can include losing 2.5lbs per month.

4 | Add specific action items to your weekly/daily calendar.

Once you have your action plan nailed down, add set action items to your calendar. Using the example above, one of the action items might be checking your weight every Monday morning. Another might be adding certain classes at the gym into your schedule.

By putting clear-cut tasks into your calendar, you’re setting yourself up for success. Instead of a casual idea in your mind about exercising regularly, you’re eliminating the mental energy that it takes to find the time and place to do so.

Checking off those action items on your schedule or to-do list gives you a sense of accomplishment and motivates you to keep moving forward towards your goal.

Remember to recognize your small achievements. Progress doesn’t have to be monumental to matter. Use these strategies to get back on track so that you’ll be able to really celebrate when you finally reach your goal!

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